While there is no definite answer to this question, as a teacher and student of this practice, I recommend as often as possible. Everyday our bodies need attention, to communicate messages that are supportive of tuning into homeostasis (a fancy word meaning when the body is in harmony). This practice and communication will lead to a more balanced and supportive flow throughout the day. In every moment our bodies feel differently, there are some times when we may feel more sluggish and stiff then others, while other days we are feeling flexible and strong. It’s important to bring into the practice a deep honouring of where you are at, in each moment. The body may be trying to communicate a message to slow down. This is the time to practice more gentle postures and deep breathing. Even if you only have time to get 10-15 mins in here and there throughout the day and in-between the daily activities, I can guarantee you’ll feel better and have access to more energy throughout your day.

It’s not necessary to get an intense 60 min yoga session in daily (in fact, that may NOT be beneficial for your body!), if you are listening and building a relationship with your body, mind and spirit… you’ll know exactly what daily routine to engage in. Not only is daily yoga and movement practice beneficial for the body, but it also is going to directly impact your mental state throughout the day and even improve your sleep. You may start to notice your moods are starting to balance and elevate, or that you have more space to enjoy and feel happy in your life. Your emotions start to regulate and your spirit is able to shine through. Taking the time every day to be with yourself, the sensations, the feelings, the breath, the discomfort, the aches and the pains, will lead you into a happier and healthier life! Which is what all of us want, right?!

Do yoga as often as possible, when you first wake up…move your body…throughout the day move your body as much as you can MOVE! And the days where you don’t feel like moving, lay in savasana (corpse pose) or Supta Badha Konasana (reclining butterfly pose) and practice awareness and attention to what is being experienced and/or being asked of you.

Written by: Cathy Aganoff

Cathy is an experienced physiotherapist and passionate yoga teacher. She founded TriBalance Health + Wellness to help her clients cultivate positive change and transformation.